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Law & Order – Recap & Review – Steel-Eyed Death

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Law & Order
Steel-Eyed Death

Original Air Date: Mar 1, 2010

Brittany Frederick – Staff Writer
brittanyfrederick @thetwocentscorp.com

Welcome back, Law & Order! And so, since we haven’t had any dead people for awhile, here’s four of them for you. Namely, some sick person or persons offed an entire family.

And…it also looks like they reshot Jeremy Sisto and Anthony Anderson’s title cards, and part of the opening sequence. Random, I know, but I notice these things. (“By the way, without the beards? You guys look five years younger,” Van Buren says, to which Bernard tells his partner, “Which makes you about twelve.”)

Where does one start with a quadruple homicide? By poking around the life of the teenage daughter. This leads them to a tattoo parlor where the tattoo artist talks about another girl the daughter was hanging out with. Conveniently, the friend bled on a piece of paper and the blood sample matches one in the house. (And Bernard is still giving Lupo crap about his appearance.) That friend’s name is Bonnie, who apparently gets into fights with pimps. Except for that the pimp’s dead too. A long trail of paperwork and rap lyrics leads them to a website with pictures of their dead guy…and a ton of other people besides.

Somehow, this leads them to realize Bonnie has been involved in offing said pimp and probably a couple other people besides. She tries offing herself but doesn’t have the guts to go through with it. Her partner in crime is a 19-year-old who looks like a reject from a bad horror movie and thinks there are 53 states. This is where Bonnie claims she can’t remember who she is or much else either. Huh? But it’s an excuse to bring in Dr. Emil Skoda, AKA the Nazi Murdering Bastard from Homicide, AKA J. Jonah Jameson from Spider-Man, AKA J.K. Simmons. I love this guy. He finds nothing wrong with her, and Cutter is so ready to hang her except for that Jack doesn’t want to.

So who’s really liable here? Her for being a sheep, or her buddy for dragging her along and making her in his image? Van Buren, Rubirosa and Cutter have to break this to her parents, who say she’s wonderfully perfect and don’t believe she can’t remember them. They’re in for a rude awakening when they meet her in jail. The defense wants to blame this on head trauma she once suffered making her not criminally liable. Cutter still calls BS. He thinks Jack is nuts. Jack thinks Mike is nuts. In other words, it’s a normal day at the DA’s office.

Jack’s idea is to use Bonnie as the star witness against her buddy, even if they did call her insane. His lawyer decides to call him insane. So the battle is which crazy person is to be believed or ultimately held responsible? Bonnie recounts her eyewitness view of the murders, and the defense lawyer calls her crazy. Then she starts blaming the guy’s insanity on music, TV and just about everything else.

Did I mention the defense lawyer knows Lupo from college? Uh-huh. Lupo goes and squeals to Cutter, while providing as little detail as possible. Cutter goes “OMGWTF?” So does Bernard, except Bernard threatens to beat it out of him. Lupo points out that the lawyer knows him from an earlier case where he was so messed up he got utterly wasted, and he does not want to go through that again. But ultimately, he decides he has to face his demons and takes the stand anyway. This is where we find out he blames himself for an earlier partner’s death and was diagnosed with PTSD. But as Cutter points out, Lupo never lost all his marbles and killed a few people.

This is enough to get the lawyer to tap out, and the kid gets 30 to life. But, alas, there’s always another gruesome crime scene…and so our story continues.

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